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Messages - BeardFisher-King

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1
Literature / Re: Cormac McCarthy
« on: June 12, 2019, 08:27:35 pm »
Polysemous is another new word today. You're full of them!
Oh, that's not all I'm full of, or so I've been told....  ;)

2
Literature / Re: Cormac McCarthy
« on: June 12, 2019, 04:39:41 pm »
And yes, I suspect given your reactions to TSA and obviously Neuropath, I'd imagine you wouldn't find the subject of BM appealing.
You've got me there, Wilshire.I realize that in previous posts I've been somewhat unfair to Bakker, given that there is a possibility in TNG of some kind of final defeat of the Consult/No-God/Tekne. And I also understand those readers who prefer an Earwa shut to the Outside. Bakker, in fact, certainly ends TUC with some hope for readers like myself.

As for McCormac, having read some other works, he seems to stress the sheer implacable nature of Evil, and that there are no easy answers to defeating or even mitigating it. I find it emotionally very hard to read writers like McCormac and Bakker, but it seems to be very necessary to do so.

3
Literature / Re: Cormac McCarthy
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:58:34 pm »
Oh, and how about the title of that article? "Cormac McCarthy's Polysemous Monster". Polysemous = many meanings.

4
Literature / Re: Cormac McCarthy
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:44:26 pm »
I'd have to say, I was not a fan of Blood Meridian.
From the thrust of the article, I don't think that I would enjoy reading BM either. But CMcC does seem to telling a tale of demons walking the earth; indeed, creating their own Hell on earth. So, to that extent, he is exploring some of Bakker's concerns.

5
Literature / Cormac McCarthy
« on: June 12, 2019, 02:16:35 am »
Here's a thread for all things CMcC...starting with this recent analysis (some spoilers) of "Blood Meridian".

https://churchlifejournal.nd.edu/articles/cormac-mccarthys-polysemous-monster/

6
Literature / Re: YOU MUST TELL ME ... What else are you reading?
« on: June 10, 2019, 03:18:42 pm »
It took a bit but I really enjoyed The Three-Body Problem.

Very glad to hear it, Srancy! Keep reading; "The Dark Forest" is really good, also.
Dark Forest broke into my top 10 most enjoyable books so I'd say I liked it a bit!

Excellent! I loved the conversation between Da Shi and the protagonist at the end where the protagonist explains dark forest strategy. Chilling and eye-opening.

7
Literature / Re: YOU MUST TELL ME ... What else are you reading?
« on: May 20, 2019, 03:10:25 am »
It took a bit but I really enjoyed The Three-Body Problem.

Very glad to hear it, Srancy! Keep reading; "The Dark Forest" is really good, also.

8
I dig the ending. Good call.

9
A local radio station in STL is playing "Gloria" by Laura Branigan for 24 hours today as promised in the event of a Game 7 victory by the St. Louis Blues. I've heard it roughly 20 times today....

https://youtu.be/355Fk8drgZE

10
Why? Maybe the incessant need to be in control actually fuels these things, and being told it's not your fault can be a relief.

That absolutely could be the case, and in those cases, something like a drug will likely work to get one out of a sort of positive feedback loop.

But, on the other hand, if you don't learn how to think in a way that can get yourself out of the mind-space that demands such a need for control, means that once you'd habituated to the drugs, you are right back where you started.  Locus of control is really not about an "all or nothing" position.  I mean, I drive to work, some of what will happen will be within my control, so I can "worry" about that, but I can't control what a meteor from space might do, or what the guy on the other side of the road might do.  So, indeed, it is a matter of fact that one can be a "victim of circumstance" and have little not no control over what might happen.  But at some point, you will likely have control over something, be it your reaction, your way of thinking about how to overcome what happened, or what you can do in the present to effect a positive outcome in the future.
In my work as a driver, I'm often observing driving situations and reviewing what could I have done better or differently to achieve a better outcome (for example, a smoother merge). Collisions are way more preventable than most people think; after all, nothing "comes out of nowhere".

Personal behavior change is hard. Taking pills is easy. And the placebo effect strikes at the heart of consciousness and will.

11
I would think that the placebo effect in psychiatry is significantly more important that it would be in other areas of medical science. For example, I can't imagine you'll get very far in local anaesthesia with placebos. But as for psychiatry, as H notes above, if placebos work better than drugs.....

12
The brief discussion in the NPR interview of the history of lithium was interesting. Useful element, apparently, but unprofitable, since it's an element and not a compound. 

13
General Misc. / Re: Quotes
« on: May 05, 2019, 02:03:33 am »
"A cucumber should be well-sliced, dressed with pepper and vinegar, and then thrown out. " - Dr. Samuel Johnson

14
This may be of interest to some. A recent conversation between Scruton and Peterson at Ralston College, Cambridge.

https://youtu.be/kne-YULXUzU

15
It's a Big Big Train evening chez BFK!

https://youtu.be/czgRIvcnTeE

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