Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
21
I think the overcoming of something we'd assign near zero probability is pretty cool, they get into that later in the article.

Gets into the difference between assigning random variables and actually knowing what's going on w/ causation "behind the scenes" of our mathematical designations.
22
Philosophy & Science / Re: Is there really a Determinism/Indeterminism Dichotomy?
« Last post by H on March 22, 2019, 03:17:56 pm »
I agree, though back to the OP this does undermine the idea that deterministic/random dichotomy exists in nature. Our calculations, as you say, are based on our expectations that are underpinned by a priori considerations.

Though there is a bigger challenge with consciousness and its ability to seek interest-relative cause/effect relations. How do you get that kind of consciousness *without* the very interest-relative seeking consciousness provides...As Putnam once said to explain Intentionality arising you need Intentionality...

Hmm, so maybe it all just is an issue of "frame of reference" in the same way that Relativity "redefined" Netwonian physics?

On Intentionality though, well, I am a bit in the dark, because I'm not exactly clear what that is off the top of my head.
23
Quantum Machine Appears to Defy Universe’s Push for Disorder

Quote

Freer Law

Given enough time, even a tidy room will get messy. Clothes, books and papers will leave their ordered state and scatter across the floor. Annoyingly, this tendency toward untidiness reflects a law of nature: Disorder tends to grow.

If, for example, you cut open a pressurized scuba tank, the air molecules inside will spew out and spread throughout the room. Place an ice cube in hot water and the water molecules frozen in the ordered, crystalline lattice will break their bonds and disperse. In mixing and spreading, a system strives toward equilibrium with its environment, a process called thermalization.

It’s common and intuitive, and precisely what a team of physicists expected to see when they lined up 51 rubidium atoms in a row, holding them in place with lasers. The atoms started in an orderly pattern, alternating between the lowest-energy “ground” state and an excited energy state. The researchers assumed the system would quickly thermalize: The pattern of ground and excited states would settle almost immediately into a jumbled sequence.

And at first, the pattern did jumble. But then, shockingly, it reverted to the original alternating sequence. After some more mixing, it returned yet again to that initial configuration. Back and forth it went, oscillating a few times in under a microsecond — long after it should have thermalized.

It was as if you dropped an ice cube in hot water and it didn’t just melt away, said Mikhail Lukin, a physicist at Harvard University and a leader of the group. “What you see is the ice melts and crystallizes, melts and crystallizes,” he said. “It’s something really unusual.”

Physicists have dubbed this bizarre behavior “quantum many-body scarring.” As if scarred, the atoms seem to bear an imprint of the past that draws them back to their original configuration over and over again....
24
Philosophy & Science / Re: Is there really a Determinism/Indeterminism Dichotomy?
« Last post by sciborg2 on March 22, 2019, 03:04:32 pm »
But this begins to eat away at the very idea of causation, since - as noted by Tallis in Of Time & Lamentation - when you remove interest relative causes all you have is a single cause - the Big Bang. Then the rest of causation is just like an arrow flying from a bow.

OTOH, this picture makes it difficult to account for how we discern cause-effect relations to build machines and do science in general.

And how can one even measure the probability of necessity failing? Certainly not mathematically.

All to say Lapace's demon is an entity we can conjure only when we've already observed cause-effect relations. I suspect there's some bit of question begging in the demon's make up...

Well, indeed, there is something a "problem" of perspective, given such knowledge even undermines the notion of temporallity at all.  As always, the right level of perspective is needed for the right job.  So, the view from the Big Bang is likely not helpful in building a computer, if we consider that there would be a "cost" to such a vast amount of knowledge.

I do think one could not evaluate the probability of necessity failing, which is why I say, there is no real "sense" in considering it's "chance" of happening.  If we can't evaluate what would make it happen, we can't evaluate it's likelyhood of happening.  This is why I say, it doesn't really make sense to even factor it in to a calculation, it simply must be the case that anything we figure must consider it a fact as a precondition.

I agree, though back to the OP this does undermine the idea that deterministic/random dichotomy exists in nature. Our calculations, as you say, are based on our expectations that are underpinned by a priori considerations.

Though there is a bigger challenge with consciousness and its ability to seek interest-relative cause/effect relations. How do you get that kind of consciousness *without* the very interest-relative seeking consciousness provides...As Putnam once said to explain Intentionality arising you need Intentionality...
25
The Almanac: PON Edition / Re: ARC: TTT Chapter 16
« Last post by Dora Vee on March 22, 2019, 01:12:36 pm »
"The Cnaiur and Proyas 'father-son' relationship never really goes anywhere, does it?  A wasted plot arc?"

That's how I see it. :(
26
Philosophy & Science / Re: Is there really a Determinism/Indeterminism Dichotomy?
« Last post by H on March 22, 2019, 11:39:57 am »
But this begins to eat away at the very idea of causation, since - as noted by Tallis in Of Time & Lamentation - when you remove interest relative causes all you have is a single cause - the Big Bang. Then the rest of causation is just like an arrow flying from a bow.

OTOH, this picture makes it difficult to account for how we discern cause-effect relations to build machines and do science in general.

And how can one even measure the probability of necessity failing? Certainly not mathematically.

All to say Lapace's demon is an entity we can conjure only when we've already observed cause-effect relations. I suspect there's some bit of question begging in the demon's make up...

Well, indeed, there is something a "problem" of perspective, given such knowledge even undermines the notion of temporallity at all.  As always, the right level of perspective is needed for the right job.  So, the view from the Big Bang is likely not helpful in building a computer, if we consider that there would be a "cost" to such a vast amount of knowledge.

I do think one could not evaluate the probability of necessity failing, which is why I say, there is no real "sense" in considering it's "chance" of happening.  If we can't evaluate what would make it happen, we can't evaluate it's likelyhood of happening.  This is why I say, it doesn't really make sense to even factor it in to a calculation, it simply must be the case that anything we figure must consider it a fact as a precondition.
27
The Almanac: PON Edition / Re: ARC: TTT Chapter 16
« Last post by Redeagl on March 22, 2019, 11:21:46 am »
There were a number of these mysterious scenes in TTT. Maybe they prove relevant in TNG, but most probably they aren't very relevant.
28
The Almanac: PON Edition / Re: ARC: TTT Chapter 16
« Last post by TheCulminatingApe on March 21, 2019, 09:32:34 pm »
As the sun sets, a small boy is hunched over a shattered white figure, chipping salt away.  A bid with a human head appears
Quote
”Would you like to know a secret?” A thin voice cooed. The miniature face grinned, as though finding unexpected pleasure in playing a half-hearted game.
Too numb to be terrified, the young boy nodded, clutched tight the salt that would be his fortune.
“Come closer”

I don't think we ever find out what this is all about, do we?  What is the secret?
29
The Almanac: PON Edition / Re: ARC: TTT Chapter 16
« Last post by TheCulminatingApe on March 21, 2019, 09:28:07 pm »
The Men of the Tusk are enveloped by Fanim all along the length of the aqueduct outside Shimeh.  The Shrial Knights charge – they have conviction and fury, but not numbers.  Gotian falls as the Knights sign hymns.

Then the Nansur arrive from the west.  The Inrithi cheer.  So do the Fanim – they think allies are here, but some notice unexpected banners.
Quote
This wasn't the treachery of an Emperor – an Ikurei – come to seal a pact with their Padirajah.  The hated standard of the Exalt-General, with its distinctive Kyranean disc, was nowhere to be seen.
No.  This wasn't Ikurei Conphas.  It was the Blond Beast...
King Saubon.

The Fanim withdraw.  The Holy War follows.
Quote
Horse and man thrashed black in descending fire

Another Tolkien reference?  The Pelennor Fields - specifically the arrival of the 'corsair ships'
30
The Almanac: PON Edition / Re: ARC: TTT Chapter 16
« Last post by TheCulminatingApe on March 21, 2019, 09:25:36 pm »
Quote
“I live!” Ikurei Conphas cried one more time, only to hear nothing above the crack and thunder of sorcerous battle, both near and far.  No resounding cheer, no individual shouts of relief or acclaim. They couldn't see him – that was it!  They mistook him for one of their own.  For a man...

He sees the horsemen getting closer.  A voice shouts from their midst that 'there are no more nations'.  They bear the Circumfix banner, and the Red Lion – Saubon.  And they charge him.  The Nansur will not fight – perhaps they cannot.
Quote
He saw the broadsword that took his head

-----------------------------------------------------  --------------------------------------------------------------

Eleazaras advance on Seokti the Heresiarch of the Cishaurim- his arch-enemy.  He shout out the most powerful of the Great Anaologies.  He will avenge Sasheoka.

But there is more than one Cishaurim present.

Quote
The Grandmaster of the Scarlet Spires grunted, cursed.  Jets of incandescence exploded through his Wards, immolating his left arm even as he screamed deeper defences.  A fissure opened before him.  Light blew across his scalp and brow.  Like a doll, he was thrown backward.
His corpse toppled into the burning tracts below.

Killed by their own pride and arrogance
Quote
“Set aside your conviction”, Moenghus said, “for the feeling of certainty is no more a marker of truth than the feeling of will is a marker of freedom.  Deceived men always think themselves certain, just as they always think themselves free.  This is simply what it means to be deceived.

They thought they were something they were not - something more.  Take note, Kellhus.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10