Recent Posts

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Currently popping off to Nena - Nur Geträumt
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_Tk5b1CVzg
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by H on April 17, 2019, 04:21:27 pm »
So to me it sounds like:
Final Cause says Future Events that have not yet happened actually cause Present/Past Events.

Which to me is basically pure Fate, without freewill. You can't change events because they are set in stone by the final outcome.

I don't think that's how Earwa works, but some combination of Efficient and Final Cause. (this ignoring the fact of course that its a book, and Bakker is the final cause lol).

Oh I agree it's some kind of combination. The characters can eat, shit, fuck as they please and [so on] as the Bios allows so long as the decisions concerning the No God's resurrection come to pass.

Well, doesn't Final Cause essentially supersede?

In fact, is this not what a "narrative" essentially is?  (Maybe?)
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Literature / Re: YOU MUST TELL ME ... What else are you reading?
« Last post by BeardFisher-King on April 17, 2019, 03:08:18 pm »
Started "The War Within", Book 2 of "The Great God's War" from the pen of the venerable Stephen Donaldson. Two chapters so far. I'm deliberately reading no more than one chapter per sitting.
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Literature / Re: YOU MUST TELL ME ... What else are you reading?
« Last post by Dora Vee on April 17, 2019, 05:42:02 am »
Oh...Beak. :( I might have said it this before, but I'll say it for the people in the back: I think Beak and Itkovian should get together and go bowling.

As for Natarka or whatever your name is, this is for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZJUuDLqjzU&t=51s
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by sciborg2 on April 16, 2019, 11:28:11 pm »
The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?

Did God lose Himself in the “labyrinth of the continuum”?

Quote
A second reason why I like this theory is that it enables us to explain why the universe is not perfect, despite being the mathematical image of ASA (or ‘God’ if you prefer). For, as Turing showed (as part of his proof of the undecidability of the halting problem), by far most of the real numbers are uncomputable and therefore transcendental. This means that their decimal expansions cannot be generated by any algorithm. Thus, from the perspective of algorithmic information theory, their decimal expansions are totally random. In being aware of the continuum, therefore, ASA is aware of something that is for the most part unordered, a kind of primordial chaos. ASA’s attempt to find patterns in the continuum (in order to mirror itself in those patterns) must therefore be extraordinarily difficult, indeed virtually impossible, since the ordered part of the continuum is infinitesimally small compared to the unordered part. In fact, if one could randomly pick out a real number (say, by pricking somewhere in the real number line with an infinitely sharp needle), the probability of getting an uncomputable number is approximately 1 (cf. Chaitin 2005: 113)! Perhaps this explains why the universe, despite being an image of ASA, is not perfect? It must, after all, be close to impossible for ASA to find order in the continuum.

Hm, very interesting indeed. Any chance you could elaborate on --


Oh I barely think I understand the quote or the essay itself...so not sure if it would make a difference?

-- ah, welp. Something to mull over!

(#Team No-God)

Ah you should ask your question - if I can't answer it now I might later, or more likely another person might have a clue.
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Philosophy & Science / Re: Another galaxy without dark matter
« Last post by Francis Buck on April 16, 2019, 10:36:30 pm »
In all seriousness, I find Dark Matter by itself kinda troubling to be honest. I love when people say something like, "we know about the cosmos than we do the deep sea!". I mean, okay, that's fine...but when over 80% of the fucking matter in the universe is practically intangible and, thus far, remains entire hypothetical...I'm not saying it's an alien godthing, but...

Maybe it's just nothing! 
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by Francis Buck on April 16, 2019, 10:25:26 pm »
The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?

Did God lose Himself in the “labyrinth of the continuum”?

Quote
A second reason why I like this theory is that it enables us to explain why the universe is not perfect, despite being the mathematical image of ASA (or ‘God’ if you prefer). For, as Turing showed (as part of his proof of the undecidability of the halting problem), by far most of the real numbers are uncomputable and therefore transcendental. This means that their decimal expansions cannot be generated by any algorithm. Thus, from the perspective of algorithmic information theory, their decimal expansions are totally random. In being aware of the continuum, therefore, ASA is aware of something that is for the most part unordered, a kind of primordial chaos. ASA’s attempt to find patterns in the continuum (in order to mirror itself in those patterns) must therefore be extraordinarily difficult, indeed virtually impossible, since the ordered part of the continuum is infinitesimally small compared to the unordered part. In fact, if one could randomly pick out a real number (say, by pricking somewhere in the real number line with an infinitely sharp needle), the probability of getting an uncomputable number is approximately 1 (cf. Chaitin 2005: 113)! Perhaps this explains why the universe, despite being an image of ASA, is not perfect? It must, after all, be close to impossible for ASA to find order in the continuum.

Hm, very interesting indeed. Any chance you could elaborate on --


Oh I barely think I understand the quote or the essay itself...so not sure if it would make a difference?

-- ah, welp. Something to mull over!

(#Team No-God)
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The Unholy Consult / Re: "Kellhus is dead, but not done."
« Last post by H on April 16, 2019, 07:36:40 pm »
He claims to have avoided the postmodernist pitfalls a la Gene Wolfe, BFK, but I'm never sure.

The Wolfe only prepares those pitfalls, it is the reader who stumbles!

It is the reader who stumbles.

What is the supposed this supposed "post-Modern pitfall" that Wolfe allegedly falls into? 

Genuinely wondering,
Anonymous Armchair Philosopher
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General Misc. / Re: Quotes
« Last post by sciborg2 on April 16, 2019, 03:56:23 pm »
"The rationals are spotted in the line like stars in a black sky while the dense blackness is the firmament of the irrationals"
  -G. Cantor

In honor of this reference to Peter Sas's work...
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by sciborg2 on April 16, 2019, 12:38:18 am »
This is how I see it as well - though you introduce what seems to me a really interesting point. The Gnosis has so much power within the "mundane" part of reality, the "Inside", because that aspect of God's dreaming is cogent/ordered and aligns well with God's rational and thus mathematical aspect.

Or did I misunderstand?

I'd say the Gnosis works with (or on) objective reality, rather than with subjective perceptions of reality. 

But isn't the objective reality the perception of God who dreamed up the universe and the Outside?

Or are we agreeing here but I'm too dumb to see it?

=-=-=

The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?

Did God lose Himself in the “labyrinth of the continuum”?

Quote
A second reason why I like this theory is that it enables us to explain why the universe is not perfect, despite being the mathematical image of ASA (or ‘God’ if you prefer). For, as Turing showed (as part of his proof of the undecidability of the halting problem), by far most of the real numbers are uncomputable and therefore transcendental. This means that their decimal expansions cannot be generated by any algorithm. Thus, from the perspective of algorithmic information theory, their decimal expansions are totally random. In being aware of the continuum, therefore, ASA is aware of something that is for the most part unordered, a kind of primordial chaos. ASA’s attempt to find patterns in the continuum (in order to mirror itself in those patterns) must therefore be extraordinarily difficult, indeed virtually impossible, since the ordered part of the continuum is infinitesimally small compared to the unordered part. In fact, if one could randomly pick out a real number (say, by pricking somewhere in the real number line with an infinitely sharp needle), the probability of getting an uncomputable number is approximately 1 (cf. Chaitin 2005: 113)! Perhaps this explains why the universe, despite being an image of ASA, is not perfect? It must, after all, be close to impossible for ASA to find order in the continuum.
How does that quote stack up if reality is discrete, i.e. plank length?

Oh I barely think I understand the quote or the essay itself...so not sure if it would make a difference?
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