Recent Posts

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31
Philosophy & Science / Re: Another galaxy without dark matter
« Last post by TLEILAXU on April 15, 2019, 09:29:44 pm »
One more galaxy stripped clean by the No-God.
rofl!
32
Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by TLEILAXU on April 15, 2019, 08:52:27 pm »
The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?

Did God lose Himself in the “labyrinth of the continuum”?

Quote
A second reason why I like this theory is that it enables us to explain why the universe is not perfect, despite being the mathematical image of ASA (or ‘God’ if you prefer). For, as Turing showed (as part of his proof of the undecidability of the halting problem), by far most of the real numbers are uncomputable and therefore transcendental. This means that their decimal expansions cannot be generated by any algorithm. Thus, from the perspective of algorithmic information theory, their decimal expansions are totally random. In being aware of the continuum, therefore, ASA is aware of something that is for the most part unordered, a kind of primordial chaos. ASA’s attempt to find patterns in the continuum (in order to mirror itself in those patterns) must therefore be extraordinarily difficult, indeed virtually impossible, since the ordered part of the continuum is infinitesimally small compared to the unordered part. In fact, if one could randomly pick out a real number (say, by pricking somewhere in the real number line with an infinitely sharp needle), the probability of getting an uncomputable number is approximately 1 (cf. Chaitin 2005: 113)! Perhaps this explains why the universe, despite being an image of ASA, is not perfect? It must, after all, be close to impossible for ASA to find order in the continuum.
How does that quote stack up if reality is discrete, i.e. plank length?
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Literature / Re: Stephen R. Donaldson
« Last post by BeardFisher-King on April 15, 2019, 08:46:51 pm »
Stephen Donaldson's latest, Book 2 of "The Great God's War", entitled "The War Within", is available in bookstores now. I hope to start it soon.
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by TheCulminatingApe on April 15, 2019, 08:32:20 pm »
This is how I see it as well - though you introduce what seems to me a really interesting point. The Gnosis has so much power within the "mundane" part of reality, the "Inside", because that aspect of God's dreaming is cogent/ordered and aligns well with God's rational and thus mathematical aspect.

Or did I misunderstand?

I'd say the Gnosis works with (or on) objective reality, rather than with subjective perceptions of reality. 
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by sciborg2 on April 15, 2019, 07:32:29 pm »
The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?

Did God lose Himself in the “labyrinth of the continuum”?

Quote
A second reason why I like this theory is that it enables us to explain why the universe is not perfect, despite being the mathematical image of ASA (or ‘God’ if you prefer). For, as Turing showed (as part of his proof of the undecidability of the halting problem), by far most of the real numbers are uncomputable and therefore transcendental. This means that their decimal expansions cannot be generated by any algorithm. Thus, from the perspective of algorithmic information theory, their decimal expansions are totally random. In being aware of the continuum, therefore, ASA is aware of something that is for the most part unordered, a kind of primordial chaos. ASA’s attempt to find patterns in the continuum (in order to mirror itself in those patterns) must therefore be extraordinarily difficult, indeed virtually impossible, since the ordered part of the continuum is infinitesimally small compared to the unordered part. In fact, if one could randomly pick out a real number (say, by pricking somewhere in the real number line with an infinitely sharp needle), the probability of getting an uncomputable number is approximately 1 (cf. Chaitin 2005: 113)! Perhaps this explains why the universe, despite being an image of ASA, is not perfect? It must, after all, be close to impossible for ASA to find order in the continuum.
36
General Misc. / Re: Quotes
« Last post by Francis Buck on April 15, 2019, 05:04:52 pm »
Thank you Wilshire, that is encouraging!
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Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by Francis Buck on April 15, 2019, 05:00:35 pm »
The real question is, how does Roko's Basilisk stack up against the No-God?
38
Philosophy & Science / Re: The ancient philosophers and "anagogic power"?
« Last post by sciborg2 on April 15, 2019, 04:58:10 pm »
Makes me wonder if there's more to Anagogis - I always wonder if there really is a Gnostic Daimos, given that it seems to me the Outside would fall beyond the remit of the precise description the Gnosis offers. Seems to me anything of the Outside (which is Inside in some sense iirc?) can only be grasped/leashed by way of analogy, in the way an engineer can master the external but it takes a poet to try and make a leap into the Abyss of the Internal toward the indirectly approachable but never achievable Zero-Person view....

It could be that the theorems of the gnosis just can't accurately describe Godlings from the Outside, similar to how science can't really explain why kids love cinnamon crunch.

If the Outside is the place where 'circumstances yield more and more to desire', and where the more more powerful entities of the Outside dwell in "sub-realities" that conform to their desires' (both quotes from TUC Glossary), then it would seem to be difficult to be able for the Gnosis to 'say' anything abstract about it.  You can have an abstract desire (eg happiness), but what represents that desire will inevitably vary from individual to individual - if you are to conjure happiness, that must relate to your subjective desire (i.e. what makes you happy).  Equally if you are going to summon a Ciphrang, you must surely be summoning the individual Ciphrang in question, and not an abstract concept. 

This is how I see it as well - though you introduce what seems to me a really interesting point. The Gnosis has so much power within the "mundane" part of reality, the "Inside", because that aspect of God's dreaming is cogent/ordered and aligns well with God's rational and thus mathematical aspect.

Or did I misunderstand?
39
General Earwa / Re: Cants of Compulsion
« Last post by Wilshire on April 15, 2019, 04:50:03 pm »
Both are great ideas. Kellhus Compulsing himself to do something would be quite a trick - especially given his troubles with Ajokli near the end. Though that it seemingly didn't work is probably an argument against such functionality.

Thinking on it from a meta-narrative point of view, its probably too strong a thing to incorporate into the story. You quickly get to the old Meta-Psuke level of nonsense. That said, I still enjoy the implications quite a bit, if we ignore that slant to it.

Given the Uster Scrol short story (The Carathan?), plus the various head swapping things we see and the speculation in light of those pieces of information, the idea of a meta-compulsion becoming Soul Transplanting seems to fit, if tangentially, into the universe.
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General Misc. / Re: Quotes
« Last post by Wilshire on April 15, 2019, 04:40:08 pm »
I hope some day you get a book published FB.
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