Did Inri Sejenus have the White-Luck?

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Francis Buck

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« on: August 11, 2014, 06:59:19 am »
With the revelation of what the Hundred are capable of in TAE so far, and given the nature of the White-Luck warrior, I find it more than likely that Inri Sejenus had the White-Luck, he just wasn't a warrior per se. I think the gods created Inri in a similar fashion to the way the WLW was created, only for a much different purpose: to "officialize" the varied and multi-faceted Kiunnat (just look at how differently the Zeumi, Inrithi, and Fanim all have "interpreted" the Kiunnat) into a regimented system of worship, through which the gods could more properly acquire souls. This would explain why Inri Sejenus could heal the sick, for if he was of divine origin then he is not limited to the "destructive" magic of sorcerers but to divine magic, or thaumaturgy as some here call it (the kind of stuff we see with Psatma and Porsparian, which does not at all resemble the destructive forms of sorcery, but instead is usually "creative", like the flesh-sculpture Porsparian makes of Yatwer, or the ritual of the WLW).
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 02:44:11 am by Francis Buck »

Cüréthañ

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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2014, 06:33:23 am »
Given the type of reforms Sejenus forced on the cults I kind of doubt that any particular one of the hundred was responsible for his actions.
Beyond his ascension, I don't recall any evidence of his miracles, healing or otherwise.  And I doubt he was a warrior in any sense ;-p
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Alia

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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2014, 07:46:00 am »
Beyond his ascension, I don't recall any evidence of his miracles, healing or otherwise.  And I doubt he was a warrior in any sense ;-p

And yet - there is a passage in Chapter Six of TTT:
Quote
“Ah, yes, Proyas the Judge.” The Marshal leaned back into his drink and cushions. When he continued, it was with a strange, dislocated voice—one that had discarded hope. “So he bade Horomon,” he quoted, “to offer his cheeks into his hands, saying to the others, ‘This man, who has put out the eyes of his enemy, the God has struck blind.’ Then he spit once into each socket and said, ‘This man, who has sinned, I have made clean.’ And Horomon cried out in wonder, for he had been sightless, and now he could see.”
He quoted The Tractate, Achamian realized, the famed passage where Inri Sejenus restored the sight of a notorious Xerashi criminal. For many Inrithi, “seeing with Horomon’s eyes” was synonymous with “revelation.”
Xinemus turned from Proyas to Achamian, as though from a lesser to a greater enemy. “He cannot heal, Akka. The Warrior-Prophet … He cannot heal.”
The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom - William Blake

SilentRoamer

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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2014, 10:27:51 am »
Strange quote that, Horomon can see. Does he needs his eyes to see? After all we know the Cish do not require eyes to see. Did Inri show Horomon the Psukhe?

Cüréthañ

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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2014, 10:52:28 am »
Ah, nice catch Alia. :)
I have forgotten more than I remember, that's for sure.

Interesting the way the quote says, 'This man, who has sinned, I have made clean.' 
Perhaps Horoman's 'blindness' was a metaphore and Senjenus was using the Judging Eye.
Perhaps Inri was a woman disguised as a man - that would be major cool.

Lines up with having TJE and my speculation on women in Earwa so I think I will choose to believe that for a while.  :D
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 04:22:03 am by Cüréthañ »
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Triskele

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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2014, 03:28:20 am »
Heh - What if Fane was actually Inri and somehow the founders of both major religions, kind of Abraham style? 

Cüréthañ

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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2014, 11:28:16 am »
Reincarnation or just really old Inri/Fane?
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Francis Buck

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« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2014, 06:53:59 pm »
I always thought of Angeshrael as (obviously) Moses, but also as sort of a catch-all amalgamation of different biblical prophets, including Abraham as Triskele mentioned. What did the Kianene worship before Fane came around? Were they Inrithi, or did they just have a more general Kiunnat thing going on a la the North?

Triskele

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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2014, 11:34:14 pm »
I wasn't too serious and so don't have a good response, but I guess I was thinking more like him someone living on and hiding as a priest or something before being banished and becoming Fane.  Not a theory I'm actually endorsing at all.

It's a good question about Kian before Fanimry.  I feel like there's mention somewhere of how Fane "united the desert tribes" or something, but I don't recall much beyond that.  That suggests to me that while there may have been a regional culture of sorts that a single religion was not part of it. 

But...Inrithism must have been down there, right?  I mean, Shimeh is holy to both religions.  It's just that I don't recall any discussion of a mass-conversion or of people abandoning their Inthrithism to embrace Fanimry.

Cüréthañ

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« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2014, 05:58:18 am »
Well, the Kianese are described as ethnically distinct from the Kirgwi (who are Ketyai). 
The are described as 'originally a desert people from the fringes of the Great Salt (near Nenciphon in the Carathay, as far as I can tell)
Nilnamesh (also Ketyai) and Eumarna would have been their traditional neighbours. In fact, pretty much all of the surrounding nations that rose and fell are described as Ketyai.

I believe they are described as light skinned, which rules out Zeum extraction.  I am unable to tell if the Amoti are derived from any of the five Earwan tribes - perhaps they are Eamwan or Scylvendi descendants.
The other possibility is Norasai refugees.

I tend to think they originally were from Amoteu - probably refugees who fled into the desert after the one of the many times the various Ketyai nations surrounding the place conquered them.
If so, I doubt they had much of a religious tradition of their own before  Fane (3703) - desert tribes don't tend to build temples et al much.
Probably they started living in the desert well before Inri popped up in Amoteu (sometime between 2158 and 2350), so I would imagine they just had some loose superstitions involving the hundred and ancestors.

No idea how Inri could have survived long to be Fane though, lol.
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MG

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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2014, 10:07:57 pm »
Given the type of reforms Sejenus forced on the cults I kind of doubt that any particular one of the hundred was responsible for his actions.
Beyond his ascension, I don't recall any evidence of his miracles, healing or otherwise.  And I doubt he was a warrior in any sense ;-p

This is something I don't get--sometimes it seems like the WLW is a pawn of divinity in general and sometimes just Yatwer's pawn.  Halp?

locke

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« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2014, 05:26:47 am »
Better question.  What's the connection between sejenus and the no god?

Sejenus appears immediately after the inchoroi were defeated and the religion he modified was a religion they had already tampered with.  I think he was a pawn of the inchoroi. Part of their long game.

All typ0s courtesy of Samsung.

Cüréthañ

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« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2014, 10:10:07 am »
Suppressing the cults and thus the influence of the hundred, maybe?
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MG

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« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2014, 07:10:57 pm »
Better question.  What's the connection between sejenus and the no god?

Sejenus appears immediately after the inchoroi were defeated and the religion he modified was a religion they had already tampered with.  I think he was a pawn of the inchoroi. Part of their long game.

All typ0s courtesy of Samsung.


Lordy!  That's awesome and would fit with the healing!  It was tekne! 

Would fit with their earlier invasions into scripture--causes the Tractate to be produced and honored along side the Tusk!  Part of their long game is to obscure as much of the original scripture as possible?

Did the Tractate help cause the Scholastic Wars--Inchoroi trying to minimize human sorcery until they can bring back Mog?

Triskele

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« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2014, 06:50:26 pm »
If Kellhus truly wants to destroy the Consult, it would be kind of an amazing circle of circumstances to leverage men's belief in Inri to do so if Inri was actually originally a Consult tool.