A Benjuka Proposal

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MrGanondorf

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« on: March 23, 2015, 03:13:07 pm »
Benjuka, as it is presented in the text, seems practically impossible.  Whether that is true or no, my meager intellect can't begin to approach Benjuka-as-it-is, so an alternative maybe?  I was wondering if TSA could crowd-source the brains for something like Benjuka, so I'll start with some ideas i've had and maybe order will emerge.

As I read Bakker, the chief thing that makes Benjuka Benjuka is the ability of the players to make a move and thereby swap the current set of rules for a different set.  To facilitate that feature in a game I think it might be idea to start with a checkers set.  Why? Because it is simple, and so will let us crystallize the exact features of gameplay AND it's goddamn democratic--checkers is probably one of the most universal and universably available games which is good if we ever end up making something like Benjuka.

A chess set is also a good option, but I am hesitant to run with that idea since the differently shaped pieces imply unique functions and we might get bogged down in define a single nuanced set of rules when really Benjuka is about swapping rule paradigmns.  However, if the checkers thing is a no-go, maybe a version of chess could be worked up where a certain move could change a specific rule.  In other words, you could do X and then all bishops behave like knights.  This Benjuka version of Chess could be promising, what do you think?

Ok, so back to the checkers set.  Here's at least three kinds of rules, so game play could switch between them without being deterministically set switch back and forth between only 2 kinds of rules:

1) War - rules for a game where the goal is to diminish you opponent's number of pieces
2) Escape - rules for a game where the goal is to diminish the number of your own pieces
3) Pilgrimage - rules for a game where the goal is to cross the board

maybe also?

4) Noose (I can't remember what Cnaiur calls this) - rules for a game where the goal is to envelope your opponent's pieces
5) Kiyuth - rules for a game where you attempt to trick your foe into enveloping you
6) Ascension - rules for a stacking game?

WHAT DO YALL THINK?

P.S. Bakker's inspiration for Benjuka?  Obviously Calvin Ball
https://gusandcodotnet.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/calvinball1.gif

Madness

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« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2015, 03:54:53 pm »
Reddit: Benjuka - one of the posters had an interesting conception.
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Quinthane

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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2015, 04:03:15 pm »
let's just take existing games and Bakkerfy them.........Panopoly (based on Monopoly) where each player is a Dunyain leaving Ishual and moving thru Earwa. the first player to completely enslave the world wins.

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Pictionary would become Nonman Statuary.

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« Last Edit: March 23, 2015, 04:19:36 pm by Quinthane »
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The Sharmat

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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2015, 06:11:29 pm »
I don't think Benjuka is possible. Lots of video games have rules change dynamically based on decisions from the player(s).

Now, keeping track of all that without computers...that'd be hard. So I can only assume Benjuka is not as complex as it sounds and has only a few ways the rules can change. This would still seem really complex to someone in an iron age society, who only had other, simpler games to compare it with.