Pronunciation

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ThoughtsOfThelli

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« Reply #60 on: July 04, 2017, 03:45:21 pm »
It's always so interesting to me to think how one's first language shapes the way they pronounce names of fictional places/characters/etc. (likely more often in fantasy and science fiction genres because those tend to be names that aren't close to the ones you would be familiar with in real life).
I've realized that in my head, I keep "pronouncing", for instance, an "-us" at the end of a name as I would in Portuguese and not English (more of an "oos" sound). Other example - Cs tend to be "heard" as soft Cs and not more like Ks, if that makes any sense. Basically, I'm subconsciously applying Portuguese rules of phonetics to names (though it's not a 100% thing).
"Mimara" is an interesting name to me because there is a word in Portuguese which is spelled exactly the same, so that's how I pronounce it ("Mee-mah-ruh" or close enough, though I know there are plenty of people who pronounce it like that and are native English speakers).
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Wilshire

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« Reply #61 on: July 05, 2017, 01:33:52 pm »
Most of that lines up with how I pronounce things, Mimara a bit off though. Perhaps, then, equally interesting that our different biases lead to similar outcomes as well.
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H

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« Reply #62 on: July 05, 2017, 01:58:41 pm »
I am not sure if there has every really been research on this, but I would imagine that it is plausible that the language you start with informs a lot of how you will think, considering we think in language and formalize things through it.

I do, however, only give Mimara only two syllables though...
“I am a warrior of ages, Anasûrimbor . . . ages. I have dipped my nimil in a thousand hearts. I have ridden both against and for the No-God in the great wars that authored this wilderness. I have scaled the ramparts of great Golgotterath, watched the hearts of High Kings break for fury.” -Cet’ingira

Wilshire

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« Reply #63 on: July 05, 2017, 02:12:01 pm »
I am not sure if there has every really been research on this, but I would imagine that it is plausible that the language you start with informs a lot of how you will think, considering we think in language and formalize things through it.
Actually I think there has been quite a bit. I once read an article about how language affects are innate ability to sense direction. Some tribes - whos language uses cardinal direction referances for things instead of words like left or right - an unearringly find north/south and east/west when located inside an unfamiliar room without any indications of direction around them.
I'm sure there are plenty more studies out there. Conclusion - the words you know and use change how the world around you is seen and how it interacts with you.
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TLEILAXU

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« Reply #64 on: July 09, 2017, 02:15:27 am »
Even though I know it's wrong according to the pronunciation guide, in my head I often pronounce Cnaiür with a hard K ie. Knaiur. I also sometimes pronounce words with a y as ü, eg. Skülvendi instead of Skillvendi.

Wilshire

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« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2017, 07:26:23 pm »
Cilcûliccas

Any takers on that one?
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TLEILAXU

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« Reply #66 on: November 09, 2017, 08:56:46 pm »
Kilkulikkas

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« Reply #67 on: November 09, 2017, 09:02:51 pm »
Still think Sil-cool-ickus is the best flowing option.
“I am a warrior of ages, Anasûrimbor . . . ages. I have dipped my nimil in a thousand hearts. I have ridden both against and for the No-God in the great wars that authored this wilderness. I have scaled the ramparts of great Golgotterath, watched the hearts of High Kings break for fury.” -Cet’ingira

Hirtius/Pansa

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« Reply #68 on: November 09, 2017, 09:51:57 pm »
For me, for Nonmen/Ihrimsu stuff anyway, any "c" that precedes an "i" is a hissing sibilant and any "c" that precedes any other vowel is a hard consonant.

So it's Sil-kool-e-kas.

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« Reply #69 on: November 09, 2017, 09:58:32 pm »
I'm with Tleilaxuckmsdfes. I pronounce most of Bakker's "C" s as "K". Most of the ancient north language seems to be derived from the Nonman tongue, and Celmomas is a hard C. Also, Cishaurim is derived from Kishauri (sp?) so I think it usually applies. Not in all cases though, e.g.Cnauir,which is a silent C.
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Wilshire

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« Reply #70 on: November 10, 2017, 01:28:09 pm »
So for Cilcûliccas we got:

Kilkulikkas (all hard K sounds, 'as' at the end)
Sil-cool-ickus (S and K, 'us' at the end)
Sil-kool-e-kas (S and k, 'as' at the end)

Sil-kool-i-kus might be what I settle on. Granted, Kil- also makes it sound more badass ;), so I may have to waffle on that still. Thanks all!


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TaoHorror

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« Reply #71 on: November 10, 2017, 02:41:05 pm »
When I read the series, I pronounced it as Sil-kool-e-kas in my head, didn't consider other ways to pronounce it. The Kil sound is very cool, though.
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TLEILAXU

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« Reply #72 on: November 10, 2017, 05:06:42 pm »
So for Cilcûliccas we got:

Kilkulikkas (all hard K sounds, 'as' at the end)
Sil-cool-ickus (S and K, 'us' at the end)
Sil-kool-e-kas (S and k, 'as' at the end)

Sil-kool-i-kus might be what I settle on. Granted, Kil- also makes it sound more badass ;), so I may have to waffle on that still. Thanks all!
I pronounce the a as the a in taco fwiw.
I think the canon pronunciation might be all k's (due to the Ku'jara Kinmoi mention in the glossary) for nonmen names, but ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Yellow

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« Reply #73 on: November 10, 2017, 09:30:34 pm »
Definitely hard K sounds.

KIL-coo-LIH-cas.

On a related note. I realised while reading TWLW (I think) that Mog-Pharau is supposed to be pronounced Mog-Phar-OH, because he rhymed it with "woe" or somesuch, whereas I had always thought it to be Mog-Phar-OW as in "Sauron". Annoying.
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Wilshire

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« Reply #74 on: November 13, 2017, 05:59:18 pm »
That gives with my world-view, so luckily no cognitive dissonance there for old Mog.
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