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General Misc. / Re: What are you watching?
« Last post by TaoHorror on July 18, 2021, 07:38:02 pm »
Start Trek: Picard and Discovery

I'm not much of a Trekkie - I liked the original show ok growing up, I liked some of the movies, but not enough to care of it's recent resurrection. Long story short, a friend of mine convinced me to watch Picard and Discovery. If you can forgive the inane sci-fi tech, they've done well with the latest installments of the franchise. Picard was excellent, imo - very good writing, nice directing jerking the viewer back and forth, good stuff. Discovery makes me giggle, it's like Tarantino was consulted, LOL! It's a bloody mess, so I like it :). But again, you have to forgive the stupid tech and overacting, but I guess I give it props for not deviating from it's persistent theme of morality to the point of absurdity ( sometimes blowing some fucker out the airlock is the best/obvious decision - in this case, they beam you out into space, LOL! ). Anyways, Discovery has a touch of horror-show, high body count, so that brings the franchise into modern sensibilities somewhat at least. It's almost comical to see the show ride between gritty-dark and over-acted moral decisiveness. Between the 2, Picard does a better job of managing the two, but Discovery has more surprise to it, which is cool.

Anyways, I like it, I'm up to Discovery Season 1, Episode 14 and yes, too saturated with ridiculous made-up tech, but that's a consistent feature of Star Trek, so I guess I can't beat up on the show too much for that. It's certainly better written than it's predecessors. Those who've criticized Picard for not having enough action can get fucked, it's the fact that it was grounded that makes it so much better - there are movies for those who want action with stupid writing, they're called Star Wars episodes 1 - 3. But, I'm not a true Trekkie, so I guess the producers should take the feedback from those who care about it more.
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I think probably "portion of god" and/or Third Sight seems something closer to Intellect than Soul. Why else would Moenghus shine so brightly. Also, this explains why Skin Spies wouldn't necessarily jump out in the Third Sight.

The Cish don't see souls, but something else entirely.

I was thinking about this again, going back to Bakker's D&D campaign...perhaps what the Cish see is the relative portion of stats?

Souls "shine" in the sense that great souls have great intellect/charisma/wisdom...possibly even physical stats are the usual manifestation of a great soul. And since this has always worked out, as far as the Cish can explore metaphysics (they don't seem to have any facility with the Daimos) they just see the skin-spies perfect machinery as bright souls?

Skin-spies, other than raw intellectual power, would probably be very similar to dunyain. They are calculating, can do complex impressions which implies a great deal of intellect and/or problem solving capability, and they are physically stronger and faster than the Dunyain. Kellhus wins his engagements with them through trickery and luck, plus the ever present Superior Intellectual Prowess.
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Literature / Re: Yearly Reading Targets 2021
« Last post by Wilshire on July 08, 2021, 04:15:41 pm »
The Red Knight by Miles Cameron (23)

This remains one of my favorite books. Cameron is a great character writer, which an interesting (if chaotic) world for those characters to exist in. Cameron really knows his historic fighting, which make his battles (both large scale and individual) very believable and fun to read. The story of this first book is very standard fantasy, but Cameron sticks to what he knows and it makes the book better for it. The dialogue usually makes up for the standard plot, and I'm very much hoping there is unseen complexity in the woldbuilding that will be revealed later on.

I highly recommend this book.

The Fell Sword by Miles Cameron (24)

This book felt like a transition novel. Its still very good, but if felt like a story was shoehorned around the necessity of bringing the main character to a particular point. It took a whole book to get there, and it was written well, but I can't decide if it was really necessary. Luckily Cameron is delightful to read and so I can't really complain too much about it. There's still enough going on that I want to see the plot continue, and I feel invested in the vast majority of the storylines and characters. I'll pick up book 3 later on this year.

But first, Staveley just released his most recent book, and I got Wight's most recent one on sale, so I'll switch gears a bit before coming back.
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Literature / Re: Three Roses, Bk.1 by Roger Eichorn
« Last post by H on July 06, 2021, 02:17:38 pm »
Updated Prologue and Chapter 1: Three Roses.
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Literature / Re: Yearly Reading Targets 2021
« Last post by The P on July 06, 2021, 02:07:49 pm »
With Blood Upon the Sand by Bradley P. Beaulieu (13)

This book improved upon the first in every way, I think.  The good and bad from the first book get more nuanced into grayer shades.  We get more magic going on, and from that there is also a much needed (imo) new pov.  Even with the new one, there are still only five viewpoint characters.  The stakes are raised, and we get a lot more insight into the Kings' origins and their current intrigues.  The two main characters from the first book, who have same goal, find themselves on very different paths in this book, which creates some nice tension when they come together.  Some exciting action sequences and an increase in supernatural occurrences give me further hope that the next four books will keep ramping up.

The Big Score by K. J. Parker (14)

I will read everything K. J. Parker writes (but for some reason not Tom Holt, go figure), and I will enjoy it.  This is another novella, loosely following Blue and Gold and The Devil You Know in the further escapades of notorious felon and polymath genius Saloninus (think Shakespeare mixed with Da Vinci).  It is of course thoroughly enjoyable; I laughed several times, blitzed through the whole thing in an afternooon.  Parker is easily my favorite short-form author.  He has another novella and novel (end of the Siege trilogy, likely his best trilogy) coming out later this year.

Wilshire, I think the Liveship Traders series was my favorite of Hobb's Realm of the Elderlings books.  I read them all together a couple years ago, so the books blur.  Part of my enjoyment might have been getting out of the one pov of the Farseer books.
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General Misc. / Re: What are you watching?
« Last post by TaoHorror on July 05, 2021, 04:41:02 pm »
No Sudden Move

On HBO, movie, art crime film. Good in that it has a lot of cool actors and the period looks good, cool cars, etc. Descent, you'll like it if you like art crime movies ( e.g. Pulp Fiction, Snatch ).
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General Misc. / Re: Quotes
« Last post by sciborg2 on July 04, 2021, 10:33:37 pm »
“What is the Absolute? Something that appears to us in fleeting experiences--say, through the gentle smile of a beautiful woman, or even through the warm caring smile of a person who may otherwise seem ugly and rude. In such miraculous but extremely fragile moments, another dimension transpires through our reality. As such, the Absolute is easily corroded;it slips all too easily through our fingers and must be handled as carefully as a butterfly”
― Slavoj Zizek, The Fragile Absolute: Or, Why Is the Christian Legacy Worth Fighting For?
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General Misc. / Re: What are you watching?
« Last post by TaoHorror on July 02, 2021, 12:21:24 am »
The Nevers

I like it so far, 6 episodes and the next 6 episodes next year. At first it seemed like women-can-be-tough-too bullshit, but no, it's much more than that. An uninteresting premise got interesting and some peculiar shit going on makes it entertaining. It plays a trick on the viewer, setting your expectation of fanciful crazy shit, but there's design behind it all. Episode 6 sheds light on stuff, so don't get frustrated at so much unexplained for a while in the story. The dialogue is excellent and so far superior to the plot - the dialogue alone makes this show a winner. I'll stick with it to see if it gets legs, but so far pretty good. Hoping the potential complexity doesn't disappoint. I like it's following the grim-dark frame where no one is purely good or evil. I like the (potential) bad guy, they did a good job with him.
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I think probably "portion of god" and/or Third Sight seems something closer to Intellect than Soul. Why else would Moenghus shine so brightly. Also, this explains why Skin Spies wouldn't necessarily jump out in the Third Sight.

The Cish don't see souls, but something else entirely.

I was thinking about this again, going back to Bakker's D&D campaign...perhaps what the Cish see is the relative portion of stats?

Souls "shine" in the sense that great souls have great intellect/charisma/wisdom...possibly even physical stats are the usual manifestation of a great soul. And since this has always worked out, as far as the Cish can explore metaphysics (they don't seem to have any facility with the Daimos) they just see the skin-spies perfect machinery as bright souls?
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The Unholy Consult / Re: Collapse of Object and Subject
« Last post by sciborg2 on June 28, 2021, 11:09:09 pm »
We talked some more about this on the Discord - or rather I babbled to myself this weekend  :-[

There the whole lineage thing that combines human and Nonman blood, resulting in a "Two Hearted" ancestor of Kellhus.

From Knife of Many Hands there seems to be a parallel between two hearts and two personalities if not two souls.

This seems to relate to something the No-God requires to get started again, perhaps having two souls in one body creates some "flaw" or "singularity" that the Ark + NG can exploit to shut the world?

Another question is whether the Outside is made of "stuff" and can be manipulated in the same way the Inside has been manipulated using the reductonist principles of the Tekne.
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